skip to content
 
 
 

Vaulting

THe squad

Click the photos below to find out more. 

Team staff

Name Role
Richard Waygood Chef de Mission
Jane Eccles Chef d'Equipe
Caroline George Team Vet
Sam Daplyn Equine Physio
Suzi Cusick Coach
Lexi Day Coach
Sophie Thomas Head of Operations
Lucy Philips Operations
Alex van Tuyll Operations
Winnie Murphy Press Officer
Rachel Dyke Press Officer

 

How does the competition work? 

Vaulting is, essentially, gymnastics on horseback. The horse canters in a circle of at least 15m, guided by a lunger who stands in the centre of the arena. Vaulters compete together as part of a squad of six (with up to three on the horse at any one time), in pairs (also known as pas-de-deux), or as individuals. Competitors wear form-fitting catsuits, which are styled to suit their routines, and identifying numbers on either their arm, leg or back if competing as part of a squad. Vaulters also wear soft-soled shoes, similar to trampolining shoes, which can be dyed or covered to match their catsuit.

There are up to eight judges at a World Championship, appointed by the FEI. Each test is marked out of 10, taking into account coefficients awarded for execution of the exercises (performance score), artistic merit, technique and a score for the horse. 

There are three different tests that might be included in a competition – compulsory test, free tests and technical tests. 

  • Compulsory tests consist of a series of mandated movements, with the scoring based on the execution of the exercises and the score given to the horse
  • Free tests are routines set to music that are devised by the vaulter or squad, and include dynamic and static movements. Scoring is based on technique/execution of the exercises (known as the performance score), artistic merit and the score given to the horse. 
  • Technical tests are a mixture of technical exercises set by the FEI and additional free test exercises chosen by the vaulter or squad. Scoring is based on technique/execution of the exercises (known as the performance score), artistic merit of the routine and the score given to the horse. 

Squad competition

At a senior World Championship, the squad competition consists of two rounds. The first round is a compulsory test, lasting six minutes and including eight compulsory movements. All squads progress through to the final, which is a free test lasting four minutes and including single, double and triple exercises. The winning squad is decided by totalling the marks of the two tests, then dividing by two – the highest score wins. 

Pas-de-Deux

At a senior World Championship, the pas-de-deux competition consists of two rounds. The first round is a free test, lasting a one and a half minutes and including a mix of static and dynamic exercises. The top 15 pairs progress through to the final, which is another free test, this time lasting two minutes. The winning pair is decided by totalling the marks of the two tests, then dividing by two – the highest score wins. 

Individual

At a senior World Championship, the individual competition consists of three tests, split into two rounds. The first round is split into a compulsory test, followed by a technical test. The compulsory test includes eight compulsory movements but has no time limit, while the one-minute technical test consists of five technical exercises and additional free test exercises. Technical exercises test motor skills such as balance, coordination, strength, jump force and suppleness.

At the conclusion of round one, all individuals proceed to the final, which is a free test lasting one minute. The winner is decided by totalling the marks of the three tests, then diving by three – the highest score wins.